Best Audio Interface for FL Studio

Buying an audio interface for FL Studio can be a daunting task for beginners in the field of audio. There are countless technical terms, specifications, and most importantly for us, compatibility issues that we need to be aware of before making a purchase. In this buying guide, we’ll run through the top 3 choices first. Then we’ll talk about audio interfaces and what qualities you’ll find in the best audio interface for FL Studio. Finally, we’ll go through the full list based on this criteria. Let’s get started!

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In a Hurry? Here’s Our Top 3

5 of the Best Audio Interfaces for FL Studio

Tascam US-1×2

Tascam US-1x2
Tascam US-1x2 USB Audio/MIDI Interface with Microphone Preamps and iOS Compatibility
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Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on https://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The Tascam US-1×2 is a good interface for complete beginners. This interface has everything we’re looking for in our search for the best audio interface for FL Studio, with the exception of one thing – the outputs are unbalanced RCA. This means that your cables going from your audio interface to your studio monitors will be more likely to pick up noise and RF interference. I wouldn’t rule this one out, though. It still has professional-grade specs for bit depth and sample rate. It also has a balanced XLR mic input, meaning your recordings will not suffer in quality.

Features

♦ Resolution: 24-bit
♦ Max sample rate: 96 kHz
♦ Digital I/O: USB 2.0
♦ +48 V phantom power
♦ Bus powered
♦ 1 × XLR input
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS input
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × RCA I/O (L&R)

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PreSonus AudioBox USB 96

PreSounus AudioBox USB 96
PreSonus AudioBox USB 96 2x2 USB Audio Interface
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Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on https://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The PreSonus AudioBox USB 96 is up next on our list. PreSonus is a well-known company for their recording and monitoring hardware. The AudioBox is a great selection if you want to maximize your I/O capabilities. Unlike the others on this list, the AudioBox USB 96 has a set of 5-pin MIDI I/O to connect MIDI instruments like an electronic drum set. On the front, we also have two XLR/TRS combi jacks for added flexibility. The PreSonus AudioBox 96 will work with the included ASIO driver, and can also be configured for ASIO4ALL within FL Studio.

Features

♦ Resolution: 24-bit
♦ Max sample rate: 96 kHz
♦ Digital I/O: USB 2.0
♦ +48 V phantom power
♦ Bus powered
♦ 2 × XLR/TRS combi input
♦ 1 × 5-pin MIDI I/O
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × TRS main outputs (L&R)

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Focusrite Scarlett Solo (3rd Gen)

Focusrite Scarlett Solo (3rd Gen)
Focusrite Scarlett Solo (3rd Gen) USB Audio Interface with Pro Tools | First
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Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on https://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The Focusrite Scarlett Solo is #1 in our guide for some pretty good reasons. First off, buyers say that the Scarlett mic preamps sound absolutely wonderful. That’s important if recording is a priority for you. Second, the interface offers 24-bit resolution and up to 192 kHz sample rate – more than enough to create a professional recording. To top it off, all the inputs and outputs are balanced, which will eliminate any interference. Focusrite also added the “AIR” button to the 3rd generation model. This button boosts the mids and highs of your recordings, giving them a brighter touch.

Features

♦ Resolution: 24-bit
♦ Max sample rate: 192 kHz
♦ Digital I/O: USB 2.0
♦ +48 V phantom power
♦ Bus powered
♦ 1 × XLR input
♦ 1 × TRS input
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × TRS main outputs (L&R)

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Audient ID4

Audient ID4
Audient iD4 USB 2-in/2-out High Performance Audio Interface
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Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on https://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

The Audient ID4 is yet another viable option if you want to buy the best audio interface for FL Studio. This interface is comparable to the Focusrite Scarlett Solo in terms of the quality of its preamp. Some buyers even think the ID4 sounds better! Of course, some of this is subjective. Either way, if you plan on spending a lot of time honing in on your skills as a producer, the ID4 may be a great investment. One interesting feature this interface has that the others do not is the ability to link the knob to any MIDI parameter in FL Studio. It could be linked to the DAWs master volume, pitch, tempo, or any other useful control parameter.

Features

♦ Resolution: 24-bit
♦ Max sample rate: 192 kHz
♦ Digital I/O: USB 2.0
♦ +48 V phantom power
♦ Bus powered
♦ 1 × XLR/TRS combi input
♦ 1 × TRS input
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × 1/8″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × TRS main outputs (L&R)

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Behringer U-Phoria UMC204HD

Behringer U-Phoria UMC204HD
BEHRINGER (UMC204HD)
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Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on https://www.amazon.com/ at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Last on our list is the UMC204HD from Behringer. This budget interface will serve well in a beginner’s hands. For its price, it has much to offer in I/O and technical power. If you’re in need of extra inputs and MIDI connectivity, this may be your best choice. For something leaning more towards simplicity, maybe the Scarlett Solo will better fit your needs. All in all, its price and additional features such as mic pads make this one hard to ignore.

Features

♦ Resolution: 24-bit
♦ Max sample rate: 192 kHz
♦ Digital I/O: USB 2.0
♦ +48 V phantom power
♦ Bus powered
♦ 2 × XLR/TRS combi inputs
♦ 2 × TRS inputs
♦ 1 × 1/4″ TRS headphones output
♦ 1 × 5-pin MIDI I/O
♦ 2 × RCA outputs (L&R)
♦ 1 × TRS main outputs (L&R)

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How to Find the Best Audio Interface for FL Studio

It’s important to know what to look for when searching for an audio interface, especially if you’re new to music production. We’re going to look at all of important things to consider about audio interfaces such as DAW compatibility, bit depth, sample rate, and I/O considerations.

Bit Depth

Bit depth is a term that confuses many beginners. When we record a live voice through our audio interface, the interface is converting a continuous analog waveform into 0s and 1s that FL Studio can understand. Basically, bit depth is a metric that tells us how accurate the conversion from analog to digital will be for any given interface.

The sampling process records points at a set time interval determined by the sample rate. Each point is an approximation of what level the analog signal was at the time the sample was taken. The accuracy of this estimation is directly tied to the bit depth. A higher bit depth means a more accurate conversion. For pro audio, 24 bits is the standard.

Sample Rate

Sample rate is how often samples are being taken when we’re recording. The more samples we take, the more accurate the conversion. Some sample rates can be as high as 192 kHz, meaning 192,000 samples are taken per second. It’s important to note, however, that higher sample rate is only better up until a certain point.

The Nyquist-Shannon Sampling Theorem states that, to accurately represent a sampled audio signal, the sample rate must be greater than twice the maximum frequency present in the sampled waveform. Since audio frequencies only go up to roughly 20 kHz, this means we really only need a 40 kHz sample rate to sample audio with complete accuracy. For this reason, the standard sample rate for consumer audio is 44.1 kHz. Of course, there is always debate on whether or not higher sample rates actually make a difference. It’s hard to say.

Input/Output Considerations

Next, let’s talk I/O. I/O stands for input/output, and your I/O needs are going to vary depending on what you’re trying to do in FL Studio. There are many different types of I/O, but for our purposes, we’ll cover the three most common ones you’ll see:

  1. XLR – This is the I/O used to connect your interface to a microphone. XLR cables bridge the gap between your mic and your interface. XLR can be an input or an output
  2. TS/TRS – this is the I/O usually used to connect instruments or studio monitors to your audio interface. TS and TRS cables are commonly called quarter inch cables (1/4″ cable).
  3. Headphone – Headphone outputs usually falls under the 1/4″ TRS category, but the main difference here is that headphone jacks are output only.

Before you buy an audio interface, make sure to keep track of how much I/O you’ll need, and which types. If you’re going to be recording multiple instruments or voices at once, obviously you will need to choose an interface with higher I/O count.

XLR-microphone

Male XLR connector on the bottom of an Audio-Technica condenser mic.

Best Audio Interface for FL Studio: Wrap Up

FL Studio is a great DAW for both beginners and pros. If you’re getting your first audio interface to use with FL Studio, the overflow of information and technical data can be confusing to navigate. We’re here to help!

Let’s wrap up what we learned here and what to look for:

  • Bit depth – Also called resolution. This is the accuracy of the conversion from analog to digital. Look for at least 24-bit resolution for a professional level of quality.
  • Sample rate – This is how many samples are take per second when doing recording work. We should shoot for at least 44.1 kHz. However, many modern interfaces will exceed that. Whether or not higher sample rate actually makes a difference is up for debate.
  • I/O needs– Be sure to consider your specific situational needs. What’ll you be using your interface for? Will you need 1 input? Or 2? Or maybe even 4?

That’s it! We hope this guide helps you make the best choice for your FL Studio audio interface. Leave a comment below and let us know which one you get!

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